We need to connect more

“We need to connect more. We choose not to. It’s a choice, everything’s a choice. That’s what we’re choosing to do. We’re choosing not to. We’re in a Tinder world, a throw-away world. A world where actually deep connection is something that’s almost becoming avoided just because there is so much able connection that isn’t really with meaning. Those things are compromising us as human beings.”

– Emma Kenny, interview on Under the Skin Podcast #40: How to Be Spiritually Healthy in Damaged Times

Collaging and cutouts by Matisse

The Sparkle Experiment Matisse Cutouts collage

The cut-outs by Henri Matisse are some of his most colourful and playful work, made simply with paper and scissors. He even created some art from bed as his health deteriorated. It’s inspiring that he continued to make art into his 80’s and right up to the very end and was still doing it with such passion and commitment.

“During the last decade of his life Henri Matisse deployed two simple materials—white paper and gouache—to create works of wide-ranging color and complexity. An unorthodox implement, a pair of scissors, was the tool Matisse used to transform paint and paper into a world of plants, animals, figures, and shapes… He described the process of making them as both “cutting directly into color” and “drawing with scissors.” – MoMA explaining Matisse’s process

The Sparkle Experiment Matisse Cutouts collage

In Matisse A Cut Above the Rest as part of BBC The Culture Show 2014, his work was referred to as “Simple, almost childish, blazing with colour,” and “He had the audacity of simplicity.”

The simplest of ideas is usually the best. We tend to over-complicate, wanting things to be more complex in order to be ‘good’. Danielle Krysa in Collage, reminds us “You don’t need any fancy equipment or a workshop full of tools – every household has a pair of scissors and some glue or adhesive tape. In the book she interviewed Anthony Zinonos, who spoke of a special relationship with his tools: “My scissors and glue have become my best friends, they never judge me.”

The Sparkle Experiment

Spending time moving paper around with no final outcome in mind can be very meditative. It creates an intuitive, loose method working as nothing has to be fixed in place until you’ve settled on a final look. Even then you can take a photo of the arrangement and not commit to sticking it permanently which is perfect if you change your mind a lot!

Start small: Pick a few colours, cut some basic shapes and have a play. Either use a timer to force quicker decision making so once the time is up, the work becomes finished by default. Or use the intuitive method of feeling when it’s ‘done.’ There are no rules when it comes to collage.

Lose control. Don’t think. Don’t get logical

The Sparkle Experiment creativity make art leap

Considering starting a creative project? “That sounds great,” you think. But time passes and nothing happens. You’ve been wondering about it though. Is it worth spending your time and energy on this thing that seemed small and easy at first, but now seems much bigger?

Advice? DO IT. Take action and THEN have a think.

Wondering if you’ll like it won’t give you the whole picture because you only know what you know (i.e if you haven’t tried, how can you really know?). And what if this little project is the beginning of something magic? Compare that to taking action and finding out exactly how you feel. That’s a lot more data to work with and more accurate than looking into your imaginary crystal ball.

In Writing Down the Bones: Freeing the Writer Within, Natalie Goldberg asks us not to think:

“Don’t cross out. (That is editing as you write. Even if you write something you didn’t mean to write, leave it.) Don’t worry about spelling, punctuation, grammar. (Don’t even care about staying within the margins and lines on the page.) Lose control. Don’t think. Don’t get logical. Go for the jugular. (If something comes up in your writing that is scary or naked, dive right into it. It probably has lots of energy.)” [emphasis added]

Advice not just relevant for writers, but for any art-makers.

How to start? Jump in for 2 minutes: set a timer and start making. But only for 2 minutes so your ego doesn’t talk you out of it. Commit to repeating this daily for a week. Then see if you can do 2 weeks. Maybe you’ll start to feel 2 minutes isn’t long enough, maybe you get on a roll and surprise yourself. You’ll most likely feel different doing it on day 1 compared to day 7, gaining a dash of confidence along the way. If you can get over the scary hump of “I’m rubbish at this, what’s the point?” then magic is waiting for you (hint: the answer is to regularly show up in those 2 minutes).